‘Oops… It Wasn’t Cancer After All,’ Admits The National Cancer Institute/JAMA

If you look at the problem through just breast cancer overdiagnosis and overtreatment in the U.S. over the past 30 years, it has been estimated that approximately 1.3 million women were wrongly treated.  Most of these women still have no idea they were victims, and many have identified with their “aggressors” in Stolkholm syndrome like fashion, because they think their “lives were saved” by unnecessary treatment, when in fact the side effects, both physical and psychological, have almost certainly reduced both the quality and duration of their lives.

When the NCI report was released, it was a sort of vindication for those who had been advocating the position that a commonly diagnosed form of so-called “early breast cancer” known as ductal carcinoma in situ was in fact not inherently malignant and should not have warranted the conventional treatments of lumpectomy, mastectomy, radiation, and chemotherapy.

At the time, I based this on available research on the natural history of DCIS, and the extremely high survival rates from DCIS, as well as the fact that breast cancer related mortality had not declined in pace with the expansion of so-called “zero” or “early stage” cancers detected through mammography screenings, as would be expected if these diagnoses actually represented harmful clinical entities. To learn more about this still underreported tragedy in women’s healthcare, watch Dr. Gilbert Welch’s video on the topic below:

via Greenmedinfo ‘Oops… It Wasn’t Cancer After All,’ Admits The National Cancer

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