Stanford Researchers Announce Inexpensive Water-Based Battery To Boost Grid Storage | CleanTechnica

The research was published in the journal Nature Energy on April 30. Yi Cui, a professor of materials science at Stanford and senior author on the paper, says modestly, “What we’ve done is thrown a special salt into water, dropped in an electrode, and created a reversible chemical reaction that stores electrons in the form of hydrogen gas.” The basic component of the water battery is manganese sulfate, a cheap, abundant industrial salt used to make dry cell batteries, fertilizers, paper and other products, according to Stanford.

Based on the expected lifespan of the new battery, Cui estimates it would cost a penny to store enough electricity to power a 100 watt light bulb for twelve hours. “We believe this prototype technology will be able to meet Department of Energy goals for utility scale electrical storage practicality,” he says.

via Stanford Researchers Announce Inexpensive Water-Based Battery To Boost Grid Storage | CleanTechnica