The U.S. Navy Is Having a Hell of a Time Dismantling the USS Enterprise reactor, 10 submarine reactors and two cruiser nuclear reactors

The U.S. Navy Is Having a Hell of a Time Dismantling the USS Enterprise

Now, according to a new General Accounting Office report (PDF), the Navy has two options. The first is to have the Navy manage the job but let the commercial industry do the non-nuclear work. The Navy would allow industry to scrap the non-nuclear parts of the ship but preserve a 27,000-ton propulsion space containing the reactors. The propulsion space would then be transported to Puget Sound Naval Base, where the reactors would be removed and sent to Hanford. This is the most expensive option, costing a minimum of $1.05 billion up to $1.55 billion and taking 10 years to complete, starting in 2034.

Compounding the issue is a “not my problem” intergovernmental dispute. The Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program, the arm of the Navy concerned with nuclear power, says the federal Nuclear Regulatory Commission could oversee a commercial effort. But the NRC says Navy nuclear reactors are not its job. It’s not clear exactly why NNPP doesn’t want the job, although it currently has a backlog of 10 submarine reactors and two cruiser reactor to deal with (which is probably why a Navy effort won’t start until 2034). Ultimately, according to the GAO, it may take Congress to make a decision.

via Popular Mechanics The U.S. Navy Is Having a Hell of a Time Dismantling the USS Enterprise

Again, we have another example of how there is no plan, no place, and no money for nuclear waste, which takes a MILLION YEARS to ‘degrade’ and has to be guarded for all of that time. Humanity has no idea how to even safely get rid of ordinary non radioactive kitchen garbage, much less nuclear poisons.