Climate Change Comes To American Heartland | CleanTechnica

Climate Change Comes To American Heartland | CleanTechnica

But to understand why the ground became so frozen, you have to go back to last year. Mindy Beerends, a senior meteorologist at the Des Moines office of the National Weather Service, told the New York Times, “A lot of it stems from the fall flooding in September and October. The soil was saturated in the fall.” The cold in the early part of 2019 turned the ground as hard as concrete and snow piled up on top of it.

Then “on Wednesday and Thursday, warm air moved in, and we got rain, and the snow melted,” Beerends said. “The higher-than-average precipitation, combined with warm temperatures, snowmelt and the frozen ground, was a perfect storm for flooding, The ingredients were in place.”

One of the things those climate scientists — who are often vilified by those living in the Midwest — have been saying for years is that warmer air temperatures mean the atmosphere can hold more moisture and that leads to greater rainfall. The rains last week were not especially heavy but they still brought about twice as much rain as is normal for the area at this time of year.

via Climate Change Comes To American Heartland | CleanTechnica