Forced Vaccinations: Is It Time for Big Brother to Become Your Doctor?

Forced Vaccinations: Is It Time for Big Brother to Become Your Doctor?

Implying that victims are dropping like flies and that measles will soon decimate entire cities without extreme, protective countermeasures, news outlets fail to mention that most cases are not severe. On the contrary, media opportunists feed the flames. The Bloomberg editorial board hopes that these outbreaks “may finally be scaring sense” into parents who believe the “myths” that vaccines may cause “seizures, autism, mercury poisoning or death.” And in a fit of yellow journalism at its finest, a CBS affiliate in Texas featured an alarming picture of a baby supposedly suffering from measles, when in fact the child was injured by the measles vaccine. CBS “decided to use my kid as the poster child for the measles outbreak,” writes mom Dawn Neufeld on her Facebook page. “But the irony … Will doesn’t have measles in this picture; this is the reaction he had to taking the ‘safe’ MMR shot.”

Nevertheless, the witch hunt is on. Writing for Fatherly Magazine, Patrick Coleman calls for the arrest of “anti-vaxxers spreading measles,” claiming that “there are laws and precedent to prosecute.” He points out that federal law allows forced quarantines of those with certain communicable diseases, and nine states allow fines and criminal prosecution for spreading infectious disease. Certain European countries already fine parents for refusing to have their children immunized.

Reporters such as these lay blame at the doorstep of parents, but can they rightly assume unvaccinated children always cause outbreaks? A fully vaccinated 22-year-old woman sparked the 2011 measles epidemic in New York. A 1985 epidemic struck a fully immunized school in Corpus Christi, Texas. CDC researchers linked the 2014 spate of Disneyland measles to an outbreak in the Philippines that year, likely brought to the United States by an infected traveler. Some people even get measles from the vaccine, as CNN reported in March of one-year-old Elsie Mendoza. After her first dose of the measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine, she spiked a fever, developed a full body rash, and had three visits to urgent care before doctors finally admitted the vaccine was the likely culprit.

via The New American Forced Vaccinations: Is It Time for Big Brother to Become Your Doctor?