Root intelligence: Plants can think, feel and learn | New Scientist

Root intelligence: Plants can think, feel and learn | New Scientist

Had Aristotle hung out among redwoods, he might not have consigned plants to the bottom rungs of his “ladder of life”. But he didn’t, and botanists have been tormented by his legacy. For centuries, few dared challenge his judgement. Now that’s finally changing. In the past decade, researchers have been making the case for taking plants more seriously. They are finding that plants have a sophisticated awareness of their environment and of each other, and can communicate what they sense. There is also evidence that plants have memory, can integrate massive amounts of information and maybe pay attention. Some botanists argue that they are intelligent beings, with a “neurobiology” all of their own. There’s even tentative talk of plant consciousness.

Charles Darwin would have approved. He was the first to seriously question Aristotelian ideas that plants don’t have the stuff of life that animates us and other animals, simply because they don’t move

via Root intelligence: Plants can think, feel and learn | New Scientist