One tale of an American coronavirus patient, by Seraphim Hanisch

One tale of an American coronavirus patient, by Seraphim Hanisch

This is reprinted from the original piece from the Wahington Post, as presented by the Stamford Advocate, dated 28 February 2020:

(Carl Goldman, to the Washington Post, writes:)

As of my most recent test, on Thursday, I am still testing positive for the virus. But by now, I don’t require much medical care. The nurses check my temperature twice a day and draw my blood, because I’ve agreed to participate in a clinical study to try to find a treatment for coronavirus. If I test negative three days in a row, then I get to leave.

The time has passed more quickly than I would’ve expected. With my laptop, I get as much work done as I can, remotely. I catch up with friends. I take walks around my room, trying to take a thousand more steps each day. I also watch the news. It’s surreal to see everyone panic – news conferences, the stock market falling, school closures – about a disease I have. It does seem likely that coronavirus will spread in the U.S., but it won’t help anybody if we all panic. Based on my experience, I’d recommend that everyone get a good digital thermometer, just as a comfort tool, so they can reassure themselves if their noses start running. I have been relatively fortunate: At least six Diamond Princess passengers have died from the virus, of the around 705 passengers who caught it. But coronavirus doesn’t have to be a horrible calamity.

If you told me when I left home in January that I wouldn’t be back until March – that, instead, I would be confined for more than 24 days because I’d catch a novel virus at the center of what could become a pandemic – that would have completely freaked me out. But now that it’s happening, I’m just taking it one day at a time.

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Fear and panic is not helpful around this virus.