The Life Story Of Dr Alice Stewart, The Woman Who Knew Too Much – She Proved That Xrays Caused Childhood Leukemia – She Uncovered The Adverse Negative Health Effects Of Low Dose Ionizing Radiation On Humans – Very Low Doses Cause Substantial Hazard To Nuclear Workers/Public Scientific Studies | A Green Road Journal

Dr Alice Mary Stewart, née Naish (4 October 1906 – 3 June 2002) was a British physician and epidemiologist specialising in social medicine and the effects of radiation on health.  Her study of radiation-induced illness among workers at the Hanford plutonium production plant, Washington, is frequently cited by those who seek to demonstrate that even very low doses of radiation cause substantial hazard.  She was the first person to demonstrate the link between x-rays of pregnant women and high cancer rates in their children.[1] She was awarded the Right Livelihood Award in 1986 “for bringing to light in the face of official opposition the real dangers of low-level radiation.”[2]

More at;

The Life Story Of Dr Alice Stewart, The Woman Who Knew Too Much – She Proved That Xrays Caused Childhood Leukemia – She Uncovered The Adverse Negative Health Effects Of Low Dose Ionizing Radiation On Humans – Very Low Doses Cause Substantial Hazard To Nuclear Workers/Public Scientific Studies | A Green Road Journal