The State of American Restaurants, by City, November Update | Wolf Street

As of October 31, the seven-day moving average of “seated diners” was down 44.6% from the same period last year:

The reading of -100% in the chart above during the lockdowns in April means that the guest count had plunged to essentially zero because restaurants were closed.

Restaurants in most places have offered outside-dining for months. Inside dining is more restricted. In many places where inside dining is offered, it comes with limits, such as diners cannot exceed 25% or 50% of capacity, and the bar areas might be closed, which makes it tough to run a restaurant, even in survival mode.

Among the cities in the West and Hawaii for which OpenTable provides data, the seven-day moving average of “seated diners” is down the most in Seattle (-78%), San Francisco (-77%), and Honolulu (-77%), followed by Los Angeles (-63%) and Portland (-65%). Phoenix (-58%) has recently dropped to where it had been before Labor Day. Las Vegas (-30%), San Diego (-31%), and Denver (-38%) are the least bad-off, but seated diners at all three have declined recently to pre-Labor Day levels. Except for Hawaii, San Francisco, and Los Angeles, there hasn’t been any improvement over the past two months:

The State of American Restaurants, by City, November Update | Wolf Street