Losing ground: How the Trump administration has reversed U.S. housing policy | Street Roots

However history remembers this period, it must note that during the past four years, nearly 20,000 more people became homeless in this country, reaching a total of nearly 570,000 people as of 2019. More of them are now living unsheltered, and they are disproportionately Black, Indigenous, people of color and women. Those figures are based on annual tallies that are widely considered to be gross undercounts of the actual number of people experiencing homelessness.

By mid-November, Trump had fired the head of the U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness, Matthew Doherty, and within weeks replaced him with Robert Marbut, who some advocates say espouses “dehumanizing and ineffective methods,” calling his appointment a major setback.

This summer, after languishing for years through an affordable housing crisis, tens of millions of Americans lost their jobs, threatening their housing stability and pushing some one step closer to homelessness. And the pandemic has brought into focus and created a new dialogue around the chronic health and human crisis on our streets, a crisis that promises to continue well beyond election day, regardless of the outcome

Losing ground: How the Trump administration has reversed U.S. housing policy | Street Roots