Maine’s Rise in COVID-19 Cases Linked to Face Masks; The Data Shows Prolonged Face Mask Use Increases Risk of Catching Respiratory Illness

The U.S. CDC reported a meta-analysis of 10 face mask studies in the February, 2020 edition of its medical Journal, Emerging Infectious Diseases1 which concluded face masks do not work to prevent transmission of respiratory viruses.

One of the key studies cited in that CDC report was of 1607 hospital workers in Vietnam, published in the journal BMJ Open on April 22, 2015.2  The study concluded that the use of surgical masks to control viral spread (which they are not designed to do, anyway) was negligible and that the prolonged use of the iconic cloth masks, so popular in today’s society, actually increased the cases of respiratory illness significantly.

Furthermore, a more recent study conducted by the US CDC’s COVID-19 Response Team and published in the CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report3 showed that there is a 20 times greater chance of catching COVID-19 with prolonged wearing of a face mask when compared to those who never wore a face mask.    In that CDC study, it was found that of the 154 new cases of COVID-19, where patients had both a positive PCR test for the purported virus’ RNA particle and real symptoms, around 85% reported they wore a face mask often, or always, up to fourteen days prior to symptom onset.  The control group in that study also showed symptoms of some sort of respiratory illness, but had a negative COVID-19 PCR test.  In that control group, 88% of the people reported often or always wearing a face mask.  Around 4% of both groups reported never wearing a face mask prior to symptom onset.

fortfairfieldjournal Maine’s Rise in COVID-19 Cases Linked to Face Masks; The Data Shows Prolonged Face Mask Use Increases Risk of Catching Respiratory Illness