Parkinson’s Disease Spikes Linked to Carpet Cleaning Chemical, say researchers – Chemical Free Life

Researchers of a study on the link between neurological conditions and industrial and household solvent chemicals believe that the chemical trichloroethylene (TCE), commonly used in household products such as shoe polishes and carpet cleaners, as well as dry-cleaning, may be behind the recent spikes in Parkinson’s Disease*. The negative health effects of TCE have been documented in the Journal of the American Medical Association since 1932.

TCE is a known carcinogen linked to renal cell carcinoma, cancers of the cervix, liver, biliary passages, lymphatic system and male breast tissue, and fetal cardiac defects, among other effects. However, its known relationship to Parkinson’s is often overlooked due to the fact that exposure to TCE can predate the disease’s onset by decades. (Those people living or working near National Priorities List Superfund sites–sites known to be contaminated with hazardous substances such as TCE–are at especially high risk of exposure.) While some people exposed may sicken quickly, others may unknowingly work or live on contaminated sites for most of their lives before developing symptoms of Parkinson’s. (source)

The US Department of Labor has issued a guidance on TCE, saying: “The Board recommends […] exposures to… trichloroethylene (TCE) be presumed to cause, contribute, or aggravate Parkinsonism.

Parkinson’s Disease Spikes Linked to Carpet Cleaning Chemical, say researchers – Chemical Free Life