Moths and tree bark: How the Novavax vaccine works | Nebraska Medicine Omaha, NE

The Novavax method uses moth cells to make spike proteins:  Researchers select the desired genes that create certain SARS-CoV-2 antigens (spike protein).  Researchers put the genes into a baculovirus, an insect virus. The baculovirus infects moth cells and replicates inside them. These moth cells create lots of spike proteins. Researchers extract and purify the spike proteins.

Matrix-M is the adjuvant used by Novavax. It is based on a saponin extracted from the soapbark tree (Quillaja saponaria). The soapbark extract encourages immune cells to activate, generating a more potent immune response. 

Saponins are found naturally in various plant species like beans and green peas. They’re used in agriculture, animal feeds, veterinary vaccines and human food. Saponins can boost immune responses to proteins. Using the Matrix-M adjuvant, a smaller dose of spike protein achieves the desired immune response. 

Moths and tree bark: How the Novavax vaccine works | Nebraska Medicine Omaha, NE

According to virologists, the problem is that spike proteins are toxic to the human body, and all glands, organs, red blood cells, etc.

One thought on “Moths and tree bark: How the Novavax vaccine works | Nebraska Medicine Omaha, NE

  1. Interesting how all the “vaccines” for this particular virus use the spike protein as the antigen instead of using some other part of the virus that is not as toxic. I am not stupid enough to believe anyone who tells me that it is because antibodies that recognize spike proteins work better. No. It is because they have an agenda that is not exactly nice. They are saying, “we will save you from getting shot in the chest by stabbing you in the back”.

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