Burning planet: why are the world’s heatwaves getting more intense? | Extreme weather | The Guardian

A heatwave struck India and Pakistan in March, bringing the highest temperatures in that month since records began 122 years ago. Scorching weather has continued across the subcontinent, wreaking disaster for millions. Spring was more like midsummer in the US, with soaring temperatures across the country in May. Spain saw the mercury hit 40C in early June as a heatwave swept across Europe, hitting the UK last week.

The kind of crop damage that climate experts have predicted is already happening. Farmers in north India have seen their wheat being burnt by the sun. An estimated 15 to 35% of the wheat crop in states close to Delhi – Punjab, Haryana and Uttar Pradesh, India’s “wheat bowl” – has been damaged.

Heat deaths are preventable but rising. The frequency, duration and intensity of heatwaves have been rising steadily over the past 50 years, according to the Environmental Protection Agency.

Burning planet: why are the world’s heatwaves getting more intense? | Extreme weather | The Guardian