History: How America Lost Its Anti-Imperial Foreign Policy Tradition, and How It Can be Recovered -Centre for Research on Globalization

As Martin Sieff eloquently laid out in his recent article, President McKinley himself was a peacemaker, anti-imperialist of a higher order than most people realize. McKinley was also a strong supporter of two complementary policies: 1) Internally, he was a defender of Lincoln’s “American system” of protectionism, internal improvements and black suffrage and 2) Externally, he was a defender of the Monroe Doctrine that defined America’s anti-imperial foreign policy since 1823.

The Monroe Doctrine’s architect John Quincy Adams laid out this principle eloquently on July 4, 1821:“After fifty years the United States has, without a single exception, respected the independence of other nations, while asserting and maintaining her own.

That the United States does not go abroad in search of monsters to destroy. She is the well-wisher to the freedom and independence of all. She is the champion and vindicator only of her own.

That by involving itself in the internal affairs of other nations, the United States would destroy its own reason of existence; the fundamental maxims of her policy would become, then, no different than the empire America’s revolution defeated. It would be, then, no longer the ruler of itself, but the dictator of the world.”

America’s march is the march of mind, not of conquest.

Colonial establishments are engines of wrong, and that in the progress of social improvement it will be the duty of the human family to abolish them”.

History: How America Lost Its Anti-Imperial Foreign Policy Tradition, and How It Can be Recovered – Global ResearchGlobal Research – Centre for Research on Globalization